Modeling Changes in Human Nasal Function Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Methodology

Oct 21

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
203 TEER


Dennis Frank-Ito PhD Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Head & Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences at Duke University Medical Center

Advances in computing technology have led to increasing utilization of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to investigate fluid flow dynamics in the respiratory passage. CFD modeling approach has the ability to provide detailed quantitative information of airflow profile in the respiratory airway; other airflow related quantities such as pressure, velocity, wall shear stress, heat and water fluxes, resistance, as well as vapor uptake can offer additional understanding of individual-specific respiratory physiology. Recent studies by our group have focused on changes in airflow dynamics in the setting of underlying nasal pathology; topical drug delivery; and surgical alteration. For this reason, the present talk will give an overview of CFD modeling technique in the nose. In addition, the following results will be presented: (1) correlation between patient reported improvement after nasal surgery with CFD variables; (2) assessing the relationship between human nasal index and simulated physiologic variables, such as severity of air interaction with nasal wall and nasal cooling ability; (3) characterizing nasal airway patency as defined by flow resistance and flow partition in the nose, based on inter-individual anterior nasal morphologic variabilities.  

Dennis Onyeka Frank-Ito is an Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Head and Neck Surgery & Communication Sciences (formally Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery) at     Duke University Medical Center. His research interests include modeling the effects of human airway anatomy on respiratory airflow patterns, deposition of inhaled gases and particle transport using computational fluid dynamics. Before joining Duke in September 2013, Dr. Frank-Ito was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He received his B.S in Statistics from the University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria; M.S in Mathematics from Youngstown State University; while at North Carolina State University doing his Ph.D., Dr. Frank-Ito received another Master degree in Operations Research prior to obtaining a Ph.D. in Mathematics. 


Megan Autry